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Indian rescue personnel and bystanders survey the scene of a train accident in the village of Bhatkuchi, some 70kms from Guwahati early July 11, 2011. An explosion hit the train in the northeastern state of Assam, but police were unable to say whether the blast was caused by separatist militants active in the area. No fatalities were reported in that incident but 20 of the 100 injured were described by police as being in a serious condition. The Guwahati-Puri Express was nearing Ghograpara, some 70 kilometres from Assam’s main city of Guwahati, when the blast struck. Both the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) and the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) militants are active in the region, but the cause of the explosion was not known. Photograph by: STRDEL, AFP/Getty
The World In Photos: July 11, 2011

Indian rescue personnel and bystanders survey the scene of a train accident in the village of Bhatkuchi, some 70kms from Guwahati early July 11, 2011. An explosion hit the train in the northeastern state of Assam, but police were unable to say whether the blast was caused by separatist militants active in the area. No fatalities were reported in that incident but 20 of the 100 injured were described by police as being in a serious condition. The Guwahati-Puri Express was nearing Ghograpara, some 70 kilometres from Assam’s main city of Guwahati, when the blast struck. Both the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) and the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) militants are active in the region, but the cause of the explosion was not known. Photograph by:¬†STRDEL, AFP/Getty

The World In Photos: July 11, 2011

Large trees lie toppled in front of a St. John’s home last fall after tropical storm Igor blew through Newfoundland. Credit: Gary Hebbard, The Telegram
Canadian climate sleuths have detected for the first time a human hand in the increasing fury of intense storms battering the Northern Hemisphere.
According to researchers, greenhouse gases generated by human activity have intensified heavy-precipitation events since 1950 across much of North America, Europe and Asia, increasing flooding and devastation.
"Human influence is more pervasive than just a response in surface temperature," says Francis Zwiers, of the University of Victoria, referring to the rise in global temperature due to greenhouse gases.
He says human influence is now evident in the planet’s “hydrological cycle, and the behavior of the hydrological cycle.”
Read more on the study here. 

Large trees lie toppled in front of a St. John’s home last fall after tropical storm Igor blew through Newfoundland. Credit: Gary Hebbard, The Telegram

Canadian climate sleuths have detected for the first time a human hand in the increasing fury of intense storms battering the Northern Hemisphere.

According to researchers, greenhouse gases generated by human activity have intensified heavy-precipitation events since 1950 across much of North America, Europe and Asia, increasing flooding and devastation.

"Human influence is more pervasive than just a response in surface temperature," says Francis Zwiers, of the University of Victoria, referring to the rise in global temperature due to greenhouse gases.

He says human influence is now evident in the planet’s “hydrological cycle, and the behavior of the hydrological cycle.”

Read more on the study here.