The Vancouver Sun

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Western Canada's largest news team.
 
A young Canadian man has landed at the centre of a high-profile criminal case in the U.S. involving a prominent presidential historian and the alleged theft of what investigators have called a “truly breathtaking” array of rare documents and other memorabilia worth millions of dollars.
Copies of speeches penned by Franklin D. Roosevelt, an 1861 property deed signed by Abraham Lincoln and a 1780 letter sent by Benjamin Franklin to Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones were among dozens of documents seized by the FBI and Baltimore police from 24-year-old Canadian citizen Jason Savedoff and his apparent mentor, 63-year-old American antiquarian Barry Landau.
More.

A young Canadian man has landed at the centre of a high-profile criminal case in the U.S. involving a prominent presidential historian and the alleged theft of what investigators have called a “truly breathtaking” array of rare documents and other memorabilia worth millions of dollars.

Copies of speeches penned by Franklin D. Roosevelt, an 1861 property deed signed by Abraham Lincoln and a 1780 letter sent by Benjamin Franklin to Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones were among dozens of documents seized by the FBI and Baltimore police from 24-year-old Canadian citizen Jason Savedoff and his apparent mentor, 63-year-old American antiquarian Barry Landau.

More.

WHO IS MARGARET ATWOOD?*
* Asks one Toronto city councillor before Twitter erupts in anger. 

WHO IS MARGARET ATWOOD?*

* Asks one Toronto city councillor before Twitter erupts in anger. 

UBC scientists announcing “major advance” in quantum computing research

Researchers at University of B.C. announced Wednesday that they’ve made a major advance in dealing with one of the biggest obstacles to development of a  radical new kind of computer.

In a paper published online today by Nature,  the world’s top research journal, researchers at UBC and University of California Santa Barbara announced they’ve found a way to deal with decoherence - the tendency of atomic-scale particles to get quickly tangled up with the larger physical world we live in. Their work opens up a whole new area for researchers who are investigating the potential for development of quantum computers.

In an interview, UBC physics professor Phil Stamp said the university published a theory in 2006 that pointed to the solution and the Santa Barbara researchers found a way to make it work in a lab. 

More. 

Juno-winner Shad teams up with Grammy-winner Chin Injeti (Eminem) for this exclusive two-song set. 
Watch/listen here. 

Juno-winner Shad teams up with Grammy-winner Chin Injeti (Eminem) for this exclusive two-song set. 

Watch/listen here. 

The Vancouver Sun was sent exclusive video of what really happened to the couple in Richard Lam’s famous “Riot Kiss” photo, taken during the Vancouver riot on Wednesday.
View the gallery.
View the video.

The Vancouver Sun was sent exclusive video of what really happened to the couple in Richard Lam’s famous “Riot Kiss” photo, taken during the Vancouver riot on Wednesday.

View the gallery.

View the video.


International media reported with surprise at the outbreak of rioting in Vancouver after the Canucks’ Stanley Cup loss Wednesday night.
A headline on London’s Daily Mail website reads: “No, it is not another G20 protest — somebody lost an ice-hockey match.”
Washington’s respected publication The Atlantic wrote: “In Syria, they riot for freedom. In Pakistan, they riot against U.S. drone strikes. In China, they riot over many things, most recently in Guangdong province for worker’s rights. But in Canada, which is officially ranked as one of the wealthiest and most peaceful nations in the world, they riot over, yes, hockey.”
British newspaper The Guardian reported that “angry, drunken Vancouver Canucks fans took to the streets, setting cars and rubbish bins ablaze, smashing windows, showering giant TV screens with beer bottles, dancing atop overturned vehicles and looting shops.”
Read more international reaction to Vancouver’s riots.

International media reported with surprise at the outbreak of rioting in Vancouver after the Canucks’ Stanley Cup loss Wednesday night.

A headline on London’s Daily Mail website reads: “No, it is not another G20 protest — somebody lost an ice-hockey match.”

Washington’s respected publication The Atlantic wrote: “In Syria, they riot for freedom. In Pakistan, they riot against U.S. drone strikes. In China, they riot over many things, most recently in Guangdong province for worker’s rights. But in Canada, which is officially ranked as one of the wealthiest and most peaceful nations in the world, they riot over, yes, hockey.”

British newspaper The Guardian reported that “angry, drunken Vancouver Canucks fans took to the streets, setting cars and rubbish bins ablaze, smashing windows, showering giant TV screens with beer bottles, dancing atop overturned vehicles and looting shops.”



Read more international reaction to Vancouver’s riots.

One hundred and twenty-five years ago today, a wind whipped up a small fire in Yaletown. Forty-five minutes later, it had destroyed almost every building in the 10-week-old city of Vancouver, and killed eight to 21 people.
Read more.

One hundred and twenty-five years ago today, a wind whipped up a small fire in Yaletown. Forty-five minutes later, it had destroyed almost every building in the 10-week-old city of Vancouver, and killed eight to 21 people.


Read more.

B.C. targets smokers, the overweight and the sedentary

Smokers, the overweight and the sedentary will be the beneficiaries of a new $68.7 million program in B.C. to prevent chronic disease.

Premier Christy Clark announced Tuesday that $24 million will be spent on family physicians who will work with high risk patients to create a plan to get healthy. As an incentive, 50,000 patients will be eligible for a subsidy of up to $50 to pay for a gym membership, physical activity program or personal nutrition program, Clark said at a news conference.

Health authorities will receive $45 million to focus on preventive health measures.

"Prevention has got to be the future of health care, if we’re going to sustain it," Clark said. "We believe that this could save billions of dollars."

Children will be the beneficiaries of their parents’ healthier habits, Clark said.



Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/health/targets+smokers+overweight+sedentary+health+program/4832352/story.html#ixzz1NJEC93ab


Stephen Harper celebrated his first federal majority win late Monday night by downing what was left in a bottle of bubbly.
Speaking with reporters Tuesday morning, Harper told how his staff “made me pop this Champagne” in one of the party’s hotel rooms.
"After I said a few words, they passed me the Champagne and wanted me to guzzle it out of the bottle. And as some of you may know, I am not much of a drinker, but I did. However, they tricked me — there was only that much in it," he said, motioning with his fingers close together. "So much for my wild side." 

Stephen Harper celebrated his first federal majority win late Monday night by downing what was left in a bottle of bubbly.

Speaking with reporters Tuesday morning, Harper told how his staff “made me pop this Champagne” in one of the party’s hotel rooms.

"After I said a few words, they passed me the Champagne and wanted me to guzzle it out of the bottle. And as some of you may know, I am not much of a drinker, but I did. However, they tricked me — there was only that much in it," he said, motioning with his fingers close together. "So much for my wild side."